EMR and HIPAA

November-21-2014

15:51

Only readers of this site could enjoy this pharmacy sign. Thanks to HIPAA One for sharing the picture with me. Have a great weekend everyone! Stay Warm!
HIPPA Sign - Or Should We Say HIPAA Sign?

Maybe the pharmacy thought that HIPPA with two P’s stood for Patient Privacy. Of course, a quick search through posts on my site turn up 18 posts with HIPPA. So, this might be the pot calling the kettle black. I just enjoy the humor of humanity.

November-20-2014

15:34

I’m excited to tell you that we’ve officially announced the 2nd Annual Health IT Marketing and PR Conference happening May 7-8, 2015 in Las Vegas. We’ll do a full post in the future describing all the details, or you can check out the HITMC conference website for many of the details as well. It’s going to be the greatest gathering of healthcare marketing and PR executives that’s ever been done. People’s response to the first event has been amazing and I believe what we have planned for the second year will be even better. We hope we’ll see you there.

Here at EMR and HIPAA, we continue to grow and reach amazing new milestones. We just passed 10 Million pageviews on just EMR and HIPAA. We’ve done 2142 blog posts and you’ve contributed 9598 comments during that same time. Plus, I’m really excited that the Healthcare Scene blog network has over 29,500 Healthcare Scene email subscribers. I appreciate every reader that trusts us to provide thought leadership on the healthcare IT industry. We’ll keep doing everything we can to provide you value every day.

As part of our regular content, we’ve been working really hard on a number of amazing sponsored blog post series. They’ve been very well received by readers. I previously highlighted the content series that have been sponsored by Medical Management Corporation of America and The Breakaway Group. I’m sure that many of you have also enjoyed the recently started Cost Effective EHR Workflow Series that’s being sponsored by ClinicSpectrum. I’m looking forward to the amazing content these sponsored series provide readers.

Since our last post recognizing companies who support the work we do, we’ve had all of these great companies renew their sponsorships:
Ambir – Advertising since 1/2010
Cerner – Advertising since 9/2011
Canon – Advertising since 10/2012
gMed – Advertising since 8/2013
Colocation America – Advertising since 10/2013
Modernizing Medicine – Advertising since 1/2014

I’m extremely proud of those advertisers who’ve supported us for such a long time. Hard for me to believe that Ambir, for example, is about to reach their 5 year mark advertising on EMR and HIPAA.

A big thanks also goes out to our new sponsors. If you enjoy the content we create, take a minute to check out these companies and see if they can help you in your business:

HIPAA Secure Now! – I’ve written regularly about the need to do a proper HIPAA Risk Assessment in order to avoid any HIPAA penalties and to meet the meaningful use requirements. While you can do the HIPAA risk assessment in house, there’s some real value in having someone outside your organization being the one doing the HIPAA Risk Assessment. Avoids a conflict of interest. If you’re looking for someone to help you with your MU risk assessment, check out what HIPAA Secure Now has to offer.

Blue Horseshoe Network – I think their ad says it all. “Just Call Justina” if you need support for your EHR Go-Live, EHR Training or EHR optimization support. I’ve had a chance to interact with Justina myself and she’s got a lot of energy and passion for the work she does. Check out what Justina and Blue Horseshoe Network can do to help you in your EHR efforts.

Canon – You’ll see that Canon was listed in our renewing advertisers, but I wanted to highlight them here as well since they just started a big email sponsorship campaign with us. Canon is doing a lot of work to bring their fully integrated scanning solutions to healthcare organizations. We appreciate their support of our site and now our email lists as well.

You can get more details on how to get your company added to this list of EMR and HIPAA supporters. Just drop us a note on our contact us page. We’re happy to talk with you and your company about our sponsored content, display ads, email marketing, and webinar options. I think you’ll be impressed by the fully integrated email, SEO, display, and social marketing campaigns we provide.

November-19-2014

9:19

The following is a guest blog post by Jennifer Bergeron, Learning and Development Manager at The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Jennifer Bergeron

Trends and fads come and go. When they stick, it’s clear they address a consumer need, whether it’s a service, promise, or hope. Here at The Breakaway Group, A Xerox Company (TBG), we operate within a proven methodology that includes metrics, and it’s exciting to those of us who can’t get enough of good data. Most people find metrics interesting, especially when they understand how it relates to them, and the results are something they can control. Metrics are powerful.

To understand the power of data in shaping behaviors, consider the popularity of the self-monitoring fitness tracker or wearable technology. Even as their accuracy is scrutinized, sales in 2014 are predicted to land somewhere in the $14 billion range.1 Do mobile fitness trackers actually help people change their activity habits? Could doctors actually use the data to help their patients? Can companies be built on the concept of improving health with a wearable device? Not conclusively.2 Does a dedicated athlete need this kind of information? Some think not.3

So what is driving the growth of the fitness tracker market and what are these devices offering that creates millions of dedicated users? The answer is real-time data, personalized goals and feedback, and a sense of control; in other words, empowerment.

In the 70s and 80s, my grandparents spoke about their doctor as though he were infallible. They didn’t doubt, question, or even note what he prescribed, but took his advice and dealt with the outcomes. If healing didn’t progress as planned, my grandmother blamed herself, as though she’d failed him.

Jump ahead a few decades when more emphasis is being placed on collaboration. We expect our physicians to work with us, rather than dictate our treatment decisions.4 Section 3506 of the Affordable Care Act, the Program to Facilitate Shared Decision Making, states that the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is “required to establish a program that develops, tests and disseminates certificated patient decision aids.”5 The intent is to provide patients and caregivers educational materials that will help improve communication about treatment options and decisions.6

Patient portals are important tools in helping to build this foundation of shared information. The portals house and track patient health data on web-based platforms, enabling patients and physicians to easily collaborate on the patient’s health management.7  Use of patient portals is a Meaningful Use Stage 2 objective.

The first measure of meeting this objective states that more than half the patients seen during a specified Electronic Health Record reporting period must have online access to their records. The second measure puts the spotlight on the patient and their use of that web-based information. MU Stage 2 requires that more than 5% of a provider’s patients must have viewed, downloaded, or transmitted their information to another provider in order for the provider to qualify for financial incentives from the Federal government.8

Empowered consumers want information immediately, whether it’s a restaurant review, number of steps taken in the last hour, how many calories they’ve burned, or their most recent checkup results. We like to weigh the input, make a decision, and then take action. Learning and information intake, no matter the topic, is expected to happen fast.

Metrics show us where we stand and how far we’ve come, which empowers us to keep going or make a change, and then measure again. We’re in an age of wanting to know but also wanting to know what to do next. The wearable device market has met a very real need of consumers. Whether or not fitness trackers make us healthier, whether or not our doctors know what to do with the information, or if this is information an athlete would really use, these devices can serve the purpose of putting many people in control of their own health, one measurable step at a time.

Sources:
1 Harrop, D., Das, R., & Chansin G. (2014) . Wearable technology 2014-2024: Technologies, markets, forecasts. Retrieved from http://www.idtechex.com/research/reports/wearable-technology-2014-2024-technologies-markets-forecasts-000379.asp

2 Hixon, T. (2014) . Are health and fitness wearables running out of gas? Retrieved from  http://www.forbes.com/sites/toddhixon/2014/04/24/are-health-and-fitness-wearables-running-out-of-gas/

3 Real athletes don’t need wearable tech. (2014) . Retrieved from http://www.outsideonline.com/outdoor-gear/gear-shed/tech-talk/Real-Athletes-Dont-Need-Wearable-Tech.html

4 Chen, P. (2012) . Afraid to speak up at the doctor’s office. Retrieved from  http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/31/afraid-to-speak-up-at-the-doctors-office/?_r=0

5 Informed Medical Decisions Foundation. (2011-2014) .  Affordable care act. Retrieved from http://www.informedmedicaldecisions.org/shared-decision-making-policy/federal-legislation/affordable-care-act/

6 HealthcareITNews. (2014) . Patient pjortals. Retrieved from http://www.healthcareitnews.com/directory/patient-portals

7 Bajarin, T. (2014) . Where wearable health gadgets are headed. Retrieved from http://time.com/2938202/health-fitness-gadgets/

8 HealthIT.gov. (2014) . Patient ability to electronically view, download & transmit (VDT) health information. Retrieved from http://www.healthit.gov/providers-professionals/achieve-meaningful-use/core-measures-2/patient-ability-electronically-view-download-transmit-vdt-health-information

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts. The Breakaway Group is a leader in EHR and Health IT training.

November-18-2014

13:15

The people at DataMotion, cloud based HISP providers, sent me the following infographic covering the HIPAA data breaches. It’s a good reminder of the potential for data breaches in healthcare. As Marc Probst recently suggested, we should be focusing as much attention on things like security as we are on meaningful use since the penalties for a HIPAA violation are more than the meaningful use penalties.

Are You A Sitting Duck for HIPAA Data Breaches Infographic

November-17-2014

11:02

The following is a guest post by Barry Haitoff, CEO of Medical Management Corporation of America.
Barry Haitoff
No doubt social media has become an integral part of many of our lives. We use it in our personal lives and if we don’t use it personally, our children are using it all the time. With nearly 800 million daily active users on Facebook and nearly 300 million monthly active users on Twitter, most medical practices are asking how they could benefit from having their practice participate in social media.

Before I begin with the specific benefits of social media use, I should define how I’m using the term social media. In this case, I’ll be talking about social media in the broadest context. Certainly this would include platforms like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram and Google+. However, I also include healthcare focused websites like Health Grades, Angie’s List, ZocDoc, Yelp, and many more in this list. Each of these websites or mobile apps has a social aspect to them which allows the practice to engage with patients online.

Now let’s take a look at some of the benefits your practice can receive from your participation in social media.

Be Part of the Discussion – The reality of the internet is that your practice is being discussed online whether you participate or not. Many of the social media sites listed above have already created your profile and patients are talking about their experience at your practice. While you may wish that this wasn’t the case, it’s something that you can’t stop.

Given that you can’t stop patients from posting information about their visit to your office, it really benefits your practice to keep an eye on what’s being said about your practice on these social media sites. If someone posts something nice, that’s an opportunity for your practice to show some gratitude for their kindness. If someone posts something negative, that’s an opportunity for you to show some compassion even when difficult situations arise.

When a negative physician review is shown compassion, understanding, and a willingness to help, it turns a negative into a positive for your practice. Now instead of driving patients away from your practice, a sincere interest in helping the disgruntled patient will drive new patients to your practice who realize that you care about your patients. Of course, if you’re not taking part in social media, that negative comment will remain and discourage patients from ever visiting your office.

First Impressions – One of the first impressions many patients get about your practice is on your website and your social media presence. While it’s not the end all be all for how patients select a doctor, being an active participant in social media shows potential new patients that you’re a progressive organization that stays on top of the latest trends. If you’re not on social media and/or your website looks like it came out of the 90’s, many patients will wonder how well your practice keeps up with more important areas like clinical skills. Right or wrong, we draw these connections between a practice’s online presence and their ability to stay up with the latest medicine.

Engage Current Patients – Social media is a great way for your organization to engage with your current patients. One of the largest sources of new patient referrals comes from existing patients. A simple follow on Twitter or Like on Facebook creates a powerful connection between your practice and your patients. That connection then serves as a reminder to your patients of the services you provide. You’ll be surprised at the serendipity of social media. Your social media post on back pain can often arrive in the same stream as one of your patient’s friend’s complaint of back pain. Now you just gave your previous patient a simple way to refer their friend to you.

Promote High Margin Services – This doesn’t apply to all specialties, but many specialties have high margin services they can offer patients on a repeat basis. Other specialties can remind their patients of annual visits. Social media is a simple, scalable way to inform and remind patients of these high margin services. With the right set of followers, a simple tweet that says “Women, take care of yourself! Don’t forget to get your annual pap smear.” can be a really effective way to drive more patients to your practice.

Local Social Media – One challenge medical practices face is that the majority of their patient population is local. Social media and the internet by its very nature is a national and international tool. However, with the integration of GPS into every phone and location enabled web browsers, the websites and tools to target local people are amazing. Do a simple Twitter search for “back pain” and add your location and you’ll find a captive audience of people with back pain near you. Here’s a simple example I found in NYC. Once you find these potential patients, you can easily follow or engage with their tweet.

Learn from Others – While much of this list has been about driving more high quality patients to your practice, social media can also be an excellent way for doctors, practice managers, billing staff, etc to learn from their peers. You can find a community of peers on social media that are focused on pretty much any element of a medical practice. Many of them are posting amazing content which can help you learn how to do your job better. Plus, as you engage with your peers on social media, you create relationships which can be leveraged to get answers to difficult questions. Not to mention, you’ll receive the satisfaction of helping other people and developing deep friendships with amazing people. Social media is a font of knowledge just waiting for you to tap into it.

In the next post in our series, I’ll look at the tools, techniques, and social media platforms you should use to help you realize the benefits mentioned above. Are there other social media benefits I missed on my list? I’d love to hear how you’re using social media in your practice and the benefits you’ve received from it.

Medical Management Corporation of America, a leading provider of medical billing services, is a proud sponsor of EMR and HIPAA.

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