Medicine and Technology [part of HCPLive]

July-6-2014

19:00
Misuse and abuse of opioids has grown to be a serious public health concern about addiction, overdose, and death. REMS-compliant training is a critical component of the ER/LA Opioid Analgesics REMS program.

On July 9, 2012, the FDA approved a risk evaluation and mitigation strategy (REMS) for extended-release (ER) and long-acting (LA) opioid medications. The REMS introduces new safety measures to reduce risks and improve safe use of ER/LA opioids while continuing to provide access to these medications for patients in pain.

You can access free online REMS-compliant training on ER and LA opioids CME activities on QuantiaMD.

June-12-2014

19:00
Dr. Sebastian Schneeweiss recently wrote an interesting perspective article in the NEJM about big data in health care. He writes:
Two key “learning” applications of big health care data that hold the promise of improving patient care are the generation of new knowledge about the effectiveness of treatments and the prediction of outcomes. Both these functions exceed the bounds of most computer applications currently used in health care, which tend to offer physicians such tools as context-sensitive warning messages, reminders, suggestions for economical prescribing, and results of mandated quality-improvement activities. 
Physicians currently struggle to apply new medical knowledge to their own patients, since most evidence regarding the effectiveness of medical innovations has been generated by studies involving patients who differ from their own and who were treated in highly controlled research environments. But many data that are routinely collected in a health care system can be used to evaluate medical products and interventions and directly influence patient care in the very systems that generated the data.
Given that clinical trials are conducted in an environment that usually doesn't reflect the "real world," clinicians often use that as an excuse to deviate from guideline recommendations. It's actually not an excuse. When you have a patient who has certain comorbid conditions or other factors, you need to make a clinical judgement about how you will treat that individual, and that may require you to deviate from clinical practice guidelines.

Currently, it is very costly and cumbersome to conduct "real-world" research studies. But, as we collect more data about the "effectiveness of treatments and the prediction of outcomes," clinicians will be more empowered than ever before to make better clinical decisions. It won't be an era of "cookbook medicine" that's entirely driven by static algorithms and flowcharts. Instead, treatment decisions will be customized and tailored for each individual based on unique factors, genomic profiles, patient preferences, socioeconomic factors, and much more.


June-4-2014

20:00
In a few weeks, the Innovation HealthJam will happen online! June 17-19. Here's what it's going to be about:

Come together for this Innovation HealthJam and help brainstorm new ideas for the healthcare technology area. This event will challenge a large diverse group within the medical eco-system to re-frame health care in the United States. This online brainstorming event will bring together healthcare providers, healthcare technology companies, universities, patient advocacy groups, trade associations, and government agencies from the healthcare industry to discuss how innovation can address healthcare challenges. By engaging thousands of prominent leaders, professionals, and passionate individuals, the event is intended to generate breakthrough ideas that will redefine healthcare.

Topics:
  • Patient Engagement and Healthcare Design for Consumers
  • Technology and Older Adults: The New Era of Connected Aging
  • A Mobile Health Agenda for Transforming Healthcare Delivery
  • Compute for Personalized Medicine: Finding the Cause and Cure through Genomics
  • Telehealth and Telemedicine: Emerging Opportunities in Addressing the Triple Aim (Linking Patients, Caregivers and Providers)
  • Your Physician of the Future
  • Health Innovation for Vulnerable Populations - Worldwide
  • Remote Patient Monitoring (RPM)
You can sign up here: http://www.innovationhealthjam.com

Follow updates on Twitter: #InnovationHealthJam

June-3-2014

5:00
Yesterday, the FDA announced a new initiative called openFDA to give developers, health care researchers, clinicians, and the public access to important public health data. openFDA is currently in beta, but it's definitely looking quite promising.

OpenFDA utilizes a search-based Application Program Interface (API) to collect large amounts of existing publicly available data, offering developers the ability to search through text within that data, ranking results much like a search using Google would do. This method then allows them to build their own applications on top of openFDA, giving them a large amount of flexibility to determine what types of data they would like to search and how they would like to present that data to end-users. This enables a wide variety of applications to be built on one common platform.

The openFDA Initiative was formally launched with the creation of the Chief Health Informatics Officer (CHIO) and the Office of Informatics and Technology Innovation (OITI) at the FDA.

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